The Equity Alliance proactively advocates for African Americans and other communities of color to have a fair and just opportunity at realizing the American dream. We are a Nashville-based 501(c)3 non-profit organization that seeks to equip citizens with tools and strategies to engage in the civic process and empower them to take action on issues affecting their daily lives.

Panel 1

Who We Are

Tennessee ranks

50th 

in voter turnout.

Sadly, we also rank 40th in voter registration. In Davidson County, black and brown citizens, particularly those in North Nashville, live in precincts with the lowest voter turnout. This is not by accident.

We must flip this stat on its head.


The Equity Alliance proactively advocates for African Americans and other communities of color to have a fair and just opportunity at realizing the American dream. We are a Nashville-based grassroots non-profit advocacy group that seeks to equip citizens with tools and strategies to engage in the civic process and empower them to take action on issues affecting their daily lives.

What We Do

Monitor legislation, engage in policy research, and hold our state and local elected officials accountable.

Educate communities of color about the economic, social, and political issues and how impending legislation will impact their lives.

Engage and Empower citizens to take action and make their voices heard. We resist, persist, join forces, call, write, petition, assemble, and most importantly, vote.

Create alliances with individuals and groups in order to present a united front against any economic barriers that seek to marginalize, disenfranchise, or discriminate against people of color and vulnerable populations.

Our work is rooted in a set of guiding principals:

ALL MEANS ALL

We believe that all men and women are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. We must pursue and protect these rights.

COLLECTIVE BUYING POWER

We believe that there is power in numbers. We seek to use our buying power to fuel our voting power.

EDUCATION IS THE GREAT EQUALIZER

We believe that when you know better, you do better. We seek to educate individuals and communities on how to become better informed, engaged, and productive members of society.

Panel 2

Criminal Justice Reform

We believe in:

RESTORING FAMILIES

Having an absent parent due to incarceration has detrimental effects on the family.

SECOND-CHANCE LEGISLATION

Restore voting rights to those who have served their time and paid their debt to society.Ban the box

Ban the box, so that everyone can have a fair opportunity at seeking employment.

ELIMINATING UNJUST TAXATION ON THE POOR

Eliminate senseless and expensive court fees and bail fees

Decriminalization of drug-related offenses

POLICE REFORM

Required cultural competency training for all local and state law enforcement officers.

Targeted recruitment of African American men and women in law enforcement

Investment in the communities served

More viable pathways to careers in law enforcement

More rigorous job requirements

Increased starting pay for our civil servant law enforcement officers

Panel 3

Voting Rights

Tennessee ranks 50th in voter turnout, according to a 2016 study.

Sadly, we also rank 40th in voter registration. In Davidson County, black and brown citizens live in voting precincts with the lowest voter turnout. This is not by accident. We must flip this stat on its head.

Civic engagement and voter participation are essential to preserving and protecting our democracy. But our democracy is systematically suppressing the vote for communities of color through voter ID laws, purging voters from the rolls, reduced polling times and early voting periods, and tough criminal penalties that increase mass incarceration rates.

voting rights

Racial ethnic minorities, especially black Americans, played a pivotal role in Barack Obama’s 2008 and 2012 presidential wins. Now, newly released Census Bureau data confirm what many have anticipated: that both minority and black voter turnout took a decided downturn in last November’s elections

According to a Tennessean article, Nashville ranks No. 7 among large metros in wealth segregation and No. 10 among large metros when it comes to income segregation.

Wealthier people are more prone to live among themselves and poverty is more concentrated. This has implications for public safety, the quality of schools and access to good jobs.

That also has the potential to destroy the middle class, stall economic growth and concentrate poverty further.

Our aim is to remove policy barriers that make it difficult for persons of color to make their voice heard in the voting booth. We also aim to increase minority voter turnout through voter registration and education.

Panel 4

Board of Directors

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Charlane Oliver

President

Bio

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Tequila Johnson

Vice President

Bio

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Aerin Washington

Treasurer

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Kyonzte Toombs

Secretary & General Counsel

Bio

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Mariah Cole

Executive Director

Bio

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Christiane Buggs

 Bio

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Isaac Y. Addae

Bio